Browsing articles from "October, 2011"
Oct 29, 2011

The Static Jacks – “Into The Sun” (Live video)

The Static Jacks – Into The Sun from Cory McConnell on Vimeo.

Check out a video for The Static Jacks‘ “Into The Sun” comprised of live footage from their very recent gig (25 October) supporting The Wombats in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It possesses an energy that makes us very excited for their UK dates next month. Stay tuned for announcements regarding those, as well as the 7″ pre-order, in the coming week.

Article source: http://laissezfaireclub.com/2011/10/the-static-jacks-into-the-sun-live-video/

Oct 29, 2011

Introducing: Princeton

Los Angeles based quartet Princeton are new to our radar, but seem to have been around for at least a little while – upon investigation it appears they’ve already had a full-length out; “Cocoon Of Love” through Brooklyn’s Kanine Records in 2009, which spawned a UK 7″ single in early 2010 (through Jodie Victor) with their summer friendly track “Calypso Dreams”.

We came across them just the other day, thanks to the tip off from their producer Andrew Maury in the interview below. “To The Alps” is the first track we heard, and like all great music, hit us for the proverbial six. It’s a song that post dates the aforementioned LP, and is set to appear on the band’s second album, out in the US early next year. It’s a laid back, and understated slice of electronica fused indie-pop, which reminds us of bands like The Whitest Boy Alive, Hot Chip and Royksopp – and possesses a melody and hook that is hard to forget after just a couple of listens.

Perhaps their apparent operating under the radar to date is down to lead singer Jesse Kivel’s moonlighting with side project Kisses, who were the subject of a fair amount of industry hype in the UK last year. However with more songs of this undeniable quality (and immediacy) there should be no shortage of plaudits for their sophomore effort – something that in an ideal world, will translate to commercial success.

To The Alps by Princeton

MP3: Princeton – To The Alps (Radio Edit)
MP3: Princeton – To The Alps (Kinema Remix)

Article source: http://laissezfaireclub.com/2011/10/introducing-princeton/

Oct 29, 2011

Princeton – “To The Alps”

Los Angeles based quartet Princeton are new to our radar, but seem to have been around for at least a little while – upon investigation it appears they’ve already had a full-length out; “Cocoon Of Love” through Brooklyn’s Kanine Records in 2009, which spawned a UK 7″ single in early 2010 (through Jodie Victor) with their summer friendly track “Calypso Dreams”.

We came across them just the other day, thanks to the tip off from their producer Andrew Maury in the interview below. “To The Alps” is the first track we heard, and like all great music, hit us for the proverbial six. It’s a song that post dates the aforementioned LP, and is set to appear on the band’s second album, out in the US early next year. It’s a laid back, and understated slice of electronica fused indie-pop, which reminds us of bands like The Whitest Boy Alive, Hot Chip and Royksopp – and possesses a melody and hook that is hard to forget after just a couple of listens.

Perhaps their apparent operating under the radar to date is down to lead singer Jesse Kivel’s moonlighting with side project Kisses, who were the subject of a fair amount of industry hype in the UK last year. However with more songs of this undeniable quality (and immediacy) there should be no shortage of plaudits for their sophomore effort – something that in an ideal world, will translate to commercial success.

To The Alps by Princeton

MP3: Princeton – To The Alps (Radio Edit)
MP3: Princeton – To The Alps (Kinema Remix)

Article source: http://laissezfaireclub.com/2011/10/princeton-to-the-alps/

Oct 27, 2011
zac

RethinkPopMusic CMJ Night 1 Recap

As CMJ week draws to a close, major media outlets everywhere will scramble to decide which acts won big and what “buzz band” is destined to be the media darling of the year. To believe that the newly crowned kings, whoever they may be, rose like cream on the merits of talent and performance alone would be akin to believing the most qualified person in the country is elected President. The former may involve the same degree of corporate interest, politics, and backroom dealing as the latter. While some past “buzz bands” like Arcade Fire have proven to worthy of such accolades, we here at Rethink like to connect with artists based on what they bring to the table musically rather than who’s in their back pocket. It was with this fan mentality that we assembled a stellar line-up of artists for showcases on back-to-back nights at Spike Hill and Bowery Electric.

We christened CMJ 2011 with an explosive performance from Virginia natives We Run. Their “foot on the gas”, guitar driven tracks grip everyone within earshot and shake vigorously. I was amazed to learn this only marked the band’s second show. Clearly they have been spending copious amounts time tightening their sound, which provides an edge similar to The Vines and a pure rock & roll spirit in the mold of Thin Lizzy—a noted inspiration according to the band. We Run have recently claimed NYC as their new homeland and I’m ecstatic to have the opportunity to watch them slice their way through the Big Apple.

Little Racer next took the stage and reshaped the mounted energy with a California twist, losing none to spoilage. While actually hailing from Brooklyn, the band harkens to surf rock of the 60’s with a style similar to Weezer encompassing a wide range of sounds, from tropical to harmonic. (reference something they played)

Emily Greene blessed the Spike Hill crowd with her rousing pipes and finely tuned keyboard skills. Her backing band allows her greater versatility than comparable acts like Imogen Heap or Feist while matching them with the power of her hallowed voice. There is an incredible sweetness to her stage presence that presents a very intriguing dichotomy when she goes all Jerry Lee Lewis on the keys.

I profiled Hollis Brown leading up to CMJ and was even more impressed with what they brought to the stage in their live performance… no small statement, as I was blown away by their recorded material. Somewhat less blues based, their up-beat guitar driven brand of neo-southern rock had the crowd up and dancing for the entirety of the set. While I would usually advise bands to steer clear of Beatles covers, Hollis Brown brought the house down with a true-to-form performance of “Come Together” delivered with vocal conviction by front man Mike Montali.

It’s no secret that we’re huge fans of The Yes Way. While I plan on detailing their face-meltingingly wonderful CMJ set in part II of our CMJ afterglow, I couldn’t possibly recap night one without mentioning them. Blame the procrastination on my lungs and liver which are still struggling to understand what happened over the past week.

Oct 18, 2011
zac

Hollis Brown Defines “The Brooklyn Blues”

It’s with trepidation that I attempt to craft with words what distinguishes Hollis Brown from a slew of other artists on the New York scene as they are like NOTHING currently gaining notoriety.

RethinkPopMusic has been fortunate enough to have spent a great deal of time with the band over the past couple years as Bob explained in an earlier post, before immediately demanding that they provide us with their recently recorded material from Nashville that went straight to tape. Well, we recently got our hands on the music and as someone not previously familiar with Hollis Brown, I demanded that I get to write the review… though his 2, or dare I say 20, cents is obvious throughout this review.

The unfortunately overused “soul” stands out as the word best encompassing the “it” quality that thrusts this band to the front of an ever increasing pack that isn’t quite as deserving. Front man Mike Montali conveys a feeling of honesty with every line delivered from his grainy pipes. Each pause and drawn out syllable is done so with such conviction as he gives life to raw emotion. If the vocal element serves as a confession of truth, the crude growl of the guitar answers like a priest from behind the lattice offering both condemnation and solace. If there were ever to be a reincarnation of the blues, this would be it as a band like Hollis Brown will never be a Brooklyn “buzz band” because they are simply too talented for the revolving door of most blogs’ mediocre content.

The new track that catches our attention first is “Cold City” which offers an exemplary peak at the range and talent of Hollis Brown, exposing the photo negative of “Empire State of Mind”. Lyrically loyal to pioneers such as Muddy Waters & John Lee Hooker, Montali gripes on the everyday struggles of life in NYC. This all while stamping each track with an impressive delivery that shows traces of Van Morrison. Each member of the band, including the edition of their new bassist and harmonizing key driven rhythm section, shows exemplary talent and a willingness to stay true to their roots all while expanding upon the status quo. A great example of the type of talent we’re referring to would be a recent performance of a “Revolution Blues” at Brooklyn Bowl with Ian Oneil of Deer Tick.

If you would like to take a far departure from the electro-pop dominant Brooklyn music scene, Hollis Brown will showcase their gritty, textured sound at 11pm TONIGHT at The Mercury Lounge and again TOMORROW at 10:30pm as part of our CMJ showcase at Spike Hill.

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